Events – Old

 

Hellenic Society of Maine New Year Social evening

Thursday 5pm-7pm at Ebb & Flow
Restaurant

Celebrate the New Year with the Hellenic Society of Maine and participate in cutting of Vasilopita (New Year cake) and you may win the lucky coin!! Mezedes will be provided!!

Greek Dance Workshop
with Eustathios Stratis

Sunday, November 8, 3-5 p.m., Rm:102
Wishcamper,
University of Southern Maine

This workshop is FREE to everyone who is
interested
in learning how to dance popular Greek dances.

 

 “Greece’s Current Crisis: A Historian’s Reflections” by S. Victor Papacosma

Wednesday October 21 at 7 p.m.. in Room 206 at
Payson
Smith Hall at the University of Southern Maine. Free and open to
the public.

 Dr. Papacosma returns to present another
interesting
lecture, “Greece’s Current Crisis: A Histori- an’s Reflections.” As its
history since World War I indicates, Greece is no stranger to crisis. The 
dimensions of the most recent one, which began in full force in 2009 as a volatile component within a global crisis, have captured the world’s attention.
An attempt will be made to explain aspects of the traumatic situation in historical and cultural terms. It will also be argued that, although many of
the root causes for the debt crisis are self-inflicted, the Greeks alone are not totally responsible for it.

Rebetoparea Returns!

They are coming back!

Sunday – September 20, 2015 – 4:30-8:00 p.m.

Italian Heritage Center, 40 Westland Ave., Portland

After a hugely successful performance in Portland last September, “Rebetoparea” is coming back for another evening of dinner and rembetiko music, presented by the Hellenic Society of Maine. A wide array of items also will be offered in an accompanying Silent Auction that evening. Come early to get a seat and bid on your favorite
items. Doors open at 4 p.m. An Italian buffet dinner is
included in the ticket price. There will be a cash bar.

To purchase tickets for individuals or tables
 of eight, contact Chris Ziagos at 207-775-3607 or cziagos@maine.rr.com by
Wednesday,
September 16.

SPRING 2014 GREEK MOVIE SERIES – GO TO MOVIE CORNER

SPRING 2014 LECTURE SERIES

“Engineering and Technological Achievements of Ancient
Greece”

Presentor: Miltiades Zacas

Wednesday, Feb. 27, 7 pm, 205 Payson Smith Hall, USM,
Portland Campus


Ancient Greek civilization laid the foundations of our own society. Many people
are aware that the culture of ancient Greeks still impacts our lives today in literature, philosophy, arts, and politics. What remains relatively
underestimated are their technological and engineering achievements. Research reveals that ancient Greeks had developed impressive engineering technology for buildings and infrastructure systems and created machines with lasting impact on our culture. This lecture will discuss some of the engineering technological achievements of ancient Greeks for the construction of large structures, tunnels, irrigation, and waste water management systems.

 

 “They Came to Work: Early 20th C. American Labor
Conditions”

Presentor: Charles A. Scontras

Thursday, May 1, 7 pm, Room 301A, Payson Smith Hall,
USM, Portland Campus

Labor Day in Europe – May 1 – is an appropriate date for this
lecture by Prof. Scontras. Immigrants – including thousands of Greeks – who arrived in this state and the nation at the turn of the last century, were confronted with a variety of challenges adapting to new environments as they sought to earn the means of their livelihood. They labored in workplaces not designed for their health and safety, and labored under work rules that would appear to border on serfdom. Some responded to the arbitrary nature of such rules and their working environment by participating in militant expressions of dissent including strikes. Employers were challenged to harness these desperate immigrant groups into an orderly, disciplined and predictable workforce. It is clear, however, that the armies of immigrants who paraded through the gates of factories, mills, shops, and mines played a crucial role in creating the wealth of the state and nation.
A description of working conditions and a few known events involving Greeks in Maine in this immigrant story will be treated. Primary emphases will be given to working conditions which confronted all
immigrant workers.

 

Stephen C. Farrand: “The Eleusinian Mysteries:
Important Lessons from Ancient Greek Religion”

Thursday, Nov. 14, 7 pm, Rm. 201, Payson Smith Hall, USM
Portland Campus

The archeological record documents worship at Eleusis from the Mycenean Age until the late 4th century CE – a span of two thousand years. The rites celebrated there, sacred to the goddesses Demeter and Persephone, were open to all who could make the pilgrimage to Eleusis and who understood Greek. Two facts concerning this mystery cult are astonishing: 1) that its initiates
kept the climax of these rites secret; and 2) that these rites had great
meaning for people from all walks of life for such a long span of time – philosophers, poets, and even barbarous foreigners such as Augustus and Marcus Aurelius. Stephen will discuss this ancient Greek religious festival and its connection to the myths of the rape of Persephone and the grief of Demeter, and argue that this religious celebration and its deep connection to the natural world has real relevance for us today
.

SPRING 2014 GREEK MOVIE SERIES – GO TO MOVIE CORNERSPRING 2014 LECTURE SERIES

“Engineering and Technological Achievements of Ancient Greece”
Presentor: Miltiades Zacas

Wednesday, Feb. 27, 7 pm, 205 Payson Smith Hall, USM, Portland Campus

Ancient Greek civilization laid the foundations of our own society. Many people are aware that the culture of ancient Greeks still impacts our lives today in literature, philosophy, arts, and politics. What remains relatively underestimated are their technological and engineering achievements. Research reveals that ancient Greeks had developed impressive engineering technology for buildings and infrastructure systems and created machines with lasting impact on our culture. This lecture will discuss some of the engineering technological achievements of ancient Greeks for the construction of large structures, tunnels, irrigation, and waste water management systems.

“They Came to Work: Early 20th C. American Labor Conditions”

Presentor: Charles A. Scontras

Thursday, May 1, 7 pm, Room 301A, Payson Smith Hall, USM, Portland Campus

Labor Day in Europe – May 1 – is an appropriate date for this lecture by Prof. Scontras. Immigrants – including thousands of Greeks – who arrived in this state and the nation at the turn of the last century, were confronted with a variety of challenges adapting to new environments as they sought to earn the means of their livelihood. They labored in workplaces not designed for their health and safety, and labored under work rules that would appear to border on serfdom. Some responded to the arbitrary nature of such rules and their working environment by participating in militant expressions of dissent including strikes. Employers were challenged to harness these desperate immigrant groups into an orderly, disciplined and predictable workforce. It is clear, however, that the armies of immigrants who paraded through the gates of factories, mills, shops, and mines played a crucial role in creating the wealth of the state and nation. A description of working conditions and a few known events involving Greeks in Maine in this immigrant story will be treated. Primary emphases will be given to working conditions which confronted all immigrant workers.

FALL 2013 LECTURE SERIES

Mary Snell: “The Poetry of Cavafy, Seferis, Ritsos and Elytis” (Rescheduled from Spring 2013)

Thursday, Oct. 17, 7 pm, Rm. 201, Payson Smith Hall, USM Portland Campus

 Mary SnellAny anthology of modern Greek poetry includes these four masters – four poets who shaped the literature and psyche of Greece, two of whom were recognized internationally as Nobel Laureates. This talk will attempt to give a brief introduction to the poets and to their work. A few poems by each will be read in English translation and in the original Greek — to get a better sense of the sound that the poet had in his ear as he wrote.

 Mary Snell is a lifelong resident of Maine, and quarter-century seasonal resident of Lesvos, Greece. She earned her MFA in Poetry from the Stonecoast MFA program at USM, where she worked for many years in promotions for the School of Music. A poet and freelance writer, she is a former journalist and theater critic for the Maine Sunday Telegram. She is a part-time lecturer at USM and has offered summer classes in Greece for many years — one on Greek culture; and the other, a creative writing workshop co-taught with Betsy Sholl. Mary is president of the Hellenic Society of Maine and founder of the USM / Aegean Arts & Cultural Exchange.

 

Stephen C. Farrand: “The Eleusinian Mysteries: Important Lessons from Ancient Greek Religion”

Thursday, Nov. 14, 7 pm, Rm. 201, Payson Smith Hall, USM Portland Campus

   The archeological record documents worship at Eleusis from the Mycenean Age until the late 4th century CE – a span of two thousand years. The rites celebrated there, sacred to the goddesses Demeter and Persephone, were open to all who could make the pilgrimage to Eleusis and who understood Greek. Two facts concerning this mystery cult are astonishing: 1) that its initiates kept the climax of these rites secret; and 2) that these rites had great meaning for people from all walks of life for such a long span of time – philosophers, poets, and even barbarous foreigners such as Augustus and Marcus Aurelius. Stephen will discuss this ancient Greek religious festival and its connection to the myths of the rape of Persephone and the grief of Demeter, and argue that this religious celebration and its deep connection to the natural world has real relevance for us today.

Stephen Farrand majored in Classics at Amherst College, and continued his studies at Cornell University, the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, and the Russian School of Norwich University.  He has taught Latin, Russian and ancient Greek to both high school and college students over the past 30 years and currently teaches at the Chewonki Semester School in Wiscasset.  During breaks from the classroom he has worked and volunteered for a number of social activist organizations.

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Spring 2013 Lecture Series

Mary Snell: “The Poetry of Cavafy, Seferis, Ritsos and Elytis”

Wednesday, Feb. 27, 7 pm, Rm. 102, Wishcamper Center, USM Portland Campus 

Mary Snell Any anthology of modern Greek poetry includes these four masters – four poets who shaped the literature and psyche of Greece, two of whom were recognized internationally as Nobel Laureates. This talk will attempt to give a brief introduction to the poets and to their work. A few poems will be read in English translation and in the original Greek — to get a better sense of the sound the poet had in his ear.

Mary Snell is a lifelong resident of Maine, and quarter-century seasonal resident of Greece. A poet and consultant in media relations, she is a former journalist and theater critic for the Maine Sunday Telegram. She earned her MFA in Poetry from the Stonecoast MFA program at USM, where she also worked for many years in promotions for the School of Music. She is a part-time lecturer at USM, offering two summer classes in Greece — one on Greek culture, and the other, a creative writing workshop co-taught with Betsy Sholl. She is president of the Hellenic Society of Maine and founder of the USM / Aegean Arts & Cultural Exchange.

 Prof. Paul Christiansen: “The Kaleidoscope of Ancient Greek Music”

Thursday, April 18, 7 pm, Rm. 102, Wishcamper Center, USM Portland Campus 

Paul ChristensonThis lecture will address the role of music in daily life in Ancient Greece. Occasions for music making, scales and tuning, instruments, and the relation of music to poetry will be discussed. We will listen to recordings of music from extant transcriptions on period reconstructions of ancient Greek instruments.

Prof. Christiansen is Associate Professor of Musicology at the University of Southern Maine. He has offered courses in the history and analysis of Western music, world music, and musicianship at all levels from non-major to graduate. In 2007, he co-taught Bohemian Rhapsody, a culture and history course in the Czech Republic. Before coming to USM, he taught in the Musicology Department of Palacký University (Olomouc, Czech Republic) and in the Music Department of the University of California, Davis. Dr. Christiansen’s areas of research interest are Czech music, Janáček, Haydn, orientalism, hermeneutics, rock music, and music in political advertisements. In support of his research, he has received research fellowships and grants from Fulbright, DAAD, and the Czech Science Foundation.

Display Case Dedication – Portland celebrates its Greek Sister City

Posted on March 15, 2012

The dedication of an oak display case on Tuesday, April 3, 2012, at 3:30 pm in the 2nd floor Rotunda of Portland City Hall will honor the Greek Sister City relationship between Portland and Mytilene, Lesvos, Greece. The case was constructed locally with the support of community donors organized by the Hellenic Society of Maine, and joins other cases in the second floor lobby that honor Portland’s three other Sister Cities.

Officiating will be Mayor Michael Brennan, City Councilor Nicholas Mavodones, Hellenic Society of Maine president, Mary Snell, and a representative from Sen. Olympia Snowe’s office. (Lesvos is her paternal ancestral home.) 2012 presents a special opportunity to show our friendship to our Sister City. It is the 100th anniversary year of the liberation of the City of Mytilene and Lesvos Island from Ottoman rule.

Socials

Wednesday, Feb 29 – Leap Day Social at Pepper Club, 6 p.m.

HSoM Holiday Membership SOCIAL at the Pepper Club, 78 Middle St. Portland. For HSoM members, but spouses and potential new members welcome. Consider staying for dinner.

Thursday, December 15, 5-7pm
HSoM Holiday Membership SOCIAL at the Pepper Club, 78 Middle St. Portland. For HSoM members, but spouses and potential new members welcome. Consider staying for dinner.

Lectures Series

Stavros Nashi: “The Patriarchate and the Greek Minority”
Date: February 16, 7:30 pm, Rm. 207, Payson Smith Hall, USM Portland Campus
On the night of September 6, 1955, Turkish Nationalists, organized and directed by the government of prime Minister Adnan Menderes, attacked the homes, churches, and Hellenic Society of Mainebusiness establishments of the city of Istanbul’s Greek minority. That event marked the beginning of the ethnic cleansing of the city’s Greek population which stood at over 100,000. Stavros lived through those events of 1955. The Greeks of Constantinople, now numbering a few thousand, are the last vestiges of a Greek presence that has spanned thousands of years in what is now Turkey. The Ecumenical Patriarch, the spiritual leader of millions of Eastern Orthodox Christians and head of the Greek community in Turkey continues to come under increasing restrictions. Barring the opening of the Halki Seminary, closed by government decree, the Patriarchate will soon find itself without priests and unable to fulfill its functions. Stavros will discuss the Patriarchate, the Halki Seminary and the Greek minority from a historical perspective while examining the significance of these issues to all Americans in light of current events. Stavros Nashi, a resident of Saco, writes regularly for the Hellenic Voice newspaper and for his blog, My Greek Odyssey. Born in Istanbul he considers himself an American, and is very proud of his Greek heritage and Orthodox faith. Visit his blog, My Greek Odyssey, at: http://greekodyssey.typepad.com/my_greek_odyssey/

“Carl Jung and the Greeks”by Christos Gianopoulos

Date: November 17, 2011 at 7pm
Location: USM Portland Campus, Payson Smith Hall, Room 207

Hellenic Society of MaineC.G. Jung (1875-1961) is one of the towering intellectual figures of the 20th century, and his work focused on the central task of the individual to achieve self-understanding. He developed his own theories about how to read the depth of one’s own mind and to understand one’s own personality and cultural influences. He used Greek philosophical ideas from Plato and Heraclitus to  distinguish his psychological brand from those from those of his contemporaries, Sigmund Freud and Alfred Alder, and he emphasized the enduring value of the Greek myths in giving us insights into the connection between conscious thought and the deeper layers of the mind that contain potential energy and greater wisdom. In a world that is fast changing and more complicated all the time, an understanding of some basic Jungian ideas, such as archetypes, the collective unconscious, and the individuation process can help people stay true to their values and to themselves.

Christos J. Gianopoulos is an independent consultant who leads seminars in self development, and he is adjunct faculty in philosophy at the University of Maine and at Southern Maine Community College. In his consulting business, Mr. Gianopoulos has assisted many business leaders in clarifying their thinking about the direction and management of their enterprises. For the past five years, Christos has served on the Board of Directors of the C.G. Jung Center in Brunswick. He lives in Greene with his wife Christine, and he sings in the choir at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in Lewiston.

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